Here’s second trip to the river beneath Toketee Falls.

Next to that big tree in the top-middle is the perch that was described in a prior post.  This angle gives it a whole different perspective.

 

Here’s my “for the record” about going down to the river here:

I don’t see that going down is difficult or challenging.  On an average one of my trips, its comparative risk level to other actions I take is moderate, at most.  The people who have knocked out the guardrail are jackasses and are dangerous and should not be going down if that’s how they have to do it.  IIRC, there is a sign that says to not hop the guardrail.  There is also a sign at the trailhead that shows this photo:

If you don’t want people going down, don’t put this at the trailhead.  Also, finish building the trail to the bottom.  There is absolutely no reason not to put a staircase leading down, just like there is on the rest of the trail.  Or half the other similar trails I’ve been on.  It is unconscionable to limit the view of one of the best waterfalls in the state simply because a staircase has not been built.

Speaking of perspectives…

 

As you face the falls, there’s a large but shallow cavern to the left.  The rock was created eons ago by lava flows and cooled as columnar basalt.  They look like a bunch of unsharpened pencils laying in a pile.

It sinks in as you stand there that you’re standing on a bunch of this stuff that broke off and fell.  On the first of these two pictures, you can see a huge chunk in the top right that is getting ready to fall.

 

This was best described as “one tough tree”.

 

 

Because of how inconspicuous it is and where it sits, that tree is in a million photographs and most people probably never even notice it.

 

There are so many angles, so much to look at down here.

 

The first was taken on a normal setting, the second was taken using the Nighttime setting.

 

This picture is not perfect at all, but I really like the mix of colors.

 

A tiny bit of fungus that looks like either roasted marshmallows or tiny muffins.  I’m writing this, so “muffins” it is.  Second has the color filter applied.  These were smaller than a pencil eraser.

 

This is on a road a ways away while we were searching for a way to get lost.  It was not easy to crop the road out.  No color filter applied here, it looked that cool in real life.

These two were taken on a section of the North Umpqua Trail while we were looking for a couple other waterfalls and took a wrong turn.