Castle Creek – 2-24-12

I took another trip up Castle Creek and hit an unnamed waterfall on the way home.

Because of the massive amount of pictures and videos, I am going to split this trip into four blogs.  Yes 4.  This is probably the most photogenic area I've ever been in, so we're lucky it's only 4...

Probably the coolest thing about this portion of the creek is the massive boulders, which are covered in moss, plants, and even large trees.

This is back down the creek from the prior two pics.  Because the water was so high, I couldn't (safely) cross where I did in the previous trip, so I had to backtrack quite a ways down the creek.

This is the place I had to backtrack to get to. I didn't want to backtrack to leave, so I ended being stuck for a while as I tried to figure out a decent way out of here and still see what I wanted to see.

No Photoshop or tricks to get the blue color of that pool.

Here, I used the pre-shot color fade option on the camera.

I was doing two things here: 1) wasting time to figure a way out of this area, and 2) trying to capture the water trickling down like rain from that little drip.  I used the color fade and turned it to capture just the reddish-orange of the rocks.

The caves along this portion of the creek are all talus caves, formed from rocks falling together.

Inside the cave area, there was a spider eggsack with no spider to be seen.

And a fungal growth that could cause the zombie apocalypse.

This is one of the more incredible portions of the creek.  To the right of the above photo is that teal pool.  Directly ahead is a cave with another pool, really interesting rocks, and a small waterfall.  Left-of-center and above the cascade is a dark spot in the trees, which is another cave where water pours through.

I finally quit taking pictures and got serious about finding a way out without backtracking.

My brilliant idea was to cross the creek by sliding down the log, then hopping on the fly to the short distance to the opposite bank.  I made it down to where the moss no longer was and instantly began sliding on the slick wood.  My guess is the water at the end of this log was 2-3 feet deep and it was freezing cold.  I clawed my way back to the moss and found a more effective, less exciting way.

This is a truly amazing creek.

Here's a tiny rock squished in between two larger ones.

Here is the top rock that small one is squished between.  I've lived in houses smaller than this.

Further up the creek, there are more interesting places.

Here are a couple underwater bubble pics to end this portion of the trip.  Later posts will detail the rest.

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